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Full text of "The Bay Circuit Program"

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Bay Circuit 
Program 



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Massachusetts 

Department of Environmental «l 

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The Bay Circuit 

What Resources Are Part of the 
Bay Circuit? 

The Bay Circuit is a 100-mile crescent around the Massachusetts 
Bay, from Plum Island on the North Shore to Duxbury Bay on 
the South Shore. The goal of the Bay Circuit Program is to 
connect a series of parks and conservation lands with trails, 
waterways and scenic drives. The Bay Circuit will preserve the 
natural and historic heritage of the New England countryside 
surrounding Boston for the enjoyment of all. 

The resources of the Bay Circuit are rich and varied. They 
include lands protected by local, state and federal governments 
as well as by private nonprofit organizations. The Bay Circuit 
Program works with local communities and nonprofit groups to 
identify and protect the trails, waterways and scenic drives that 
can connect existing public parks and conservation lands. The 
program also targets important conservation and recreation 
resources that should be protected and included as part of this 
unique 100-mile 'circuit.' 




Trail corridors include pathways along rivers, open fields, 
former railroad beds, old public ways, forest trails and scenic 
roads. Hiking, bicycling and simple walking trails can both 
connect and provide access to recreation areas and places of 
natural beauty. 

Scenic roadways abound in the Bay Circuit. These roads range 
in characer and charm from country backroads to main streets 
with turn of the century storefronts. 

Scenic landscapes: rolling fields, wetland meadows, oak and 
maple woodlands, church steeples in the distance, rocky 
coastlines, salt marshes, streams and rivers. Where else but in 
New England does one find gems like Plum Island, the Sudbury 
River and Duxbury so close to a major metropolitan center? 

River corridors of the Bay Circuit, like the Ipswich, Charles and 
North rivers, traverse town, suburb and countryside. They 
provide drinking water, natural drainage systems, wildlife 
habitat, scenic vistas and almost unlimited recreation 
possibilities. 

Recreation lands close to home provide the outdoor spaces that 
people need for fresh air and exercise, and for spending leisure 
time with nature, family and friends. 

Coastal lands draw people of all ages, for swimming and 
sunbathing, and for enjoying the expanse of sky and sea and the 
quiet times of sunrise and sunset. 

Rare natural resources have important roles in the balance of 
nature. Wildlife sanctuaries, cedar swamps and unique rock 
formations contribute to the diversity and richness of our world. 

Cultural resources, such as Native American village sites, 
historic buildings and districts, and traditional New England 
farms and landscapes, enrich our sense of heritage and place. 









Harold Parker 
State Forest .- 




Plum Island 

State 

Reservation 




/Great Brook Farm 
" State Park 



Walden Pond -^ 
State Reservatioi 



Massachusetts 
Bay 



Cochituate 
State Park 



Ames Nowell 
State Park 



Foxborough 
State Forest 



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Duxbury 
Bay 



What Does The Bay Circuit 
Program Do? 



In order to protect important conservation and recreation 
resources and to create a series of connected parks and 
conservation lands, the Bay Circuit Program undertakes the 
following activities: 



Recreation and Public Access 

The Bay Circuit is to be enjoyed. 

The Bay Circuit Program: 

- assists communities in planning local Bay Circuit recreational 
and promotional events. 

- seeks to ensure easy public access to protected natural areas 
throughout the region. 

- works to provide adequate parking and visitor facilities where 
necessary. 

- publishes informational material on the program's activities. 



Design and Management 

Good maintenance and management of land is just as important 
as buying or protecting it. 

The Bay Circuit Program: 

- prepares masterplans for properties the Department of 
Environmental Management acquires. 

- provides assistance to cities and towns to develop local trail 
and park management programs. 



Land Protection 

Land protection can be expensive and complex. It demands the 
cooperation of many agencies, organizations and individuals and 
the use of a variety of techniques and approaches. 

The Bay Circuit Program: 

- works to create a regional network of protected lands. 

- focuses efforts on protecting resources which are not likely to 
be protected by other agencies and groups. 

- coordinates land preservation efforts with other interested 
groups and government bodies. 

- uses a variety of alternatives to outright acquisition, such as 
less-than-fee acquisition and cooperative ventures with 
nonprofit land trusts. 




Local and Regional Planning 

The goal of creating a regional network of parks and open 
spaces can be achieved only through the participation of local 
communities. 



The Bay Circuit Program: 

- assists communities with the development of open space plans. 
Open space plans identify conservation and recreation lands 
that are important to protect. They also specify the actions a 
community can take to protect them, including identifying 
sources of funding. 

- provides planning grants to Bay Circuit cities and towns. In 
1986, $125,000 was awarded to twenty eight communities. 
Projects include creating local and regional trail systems, a 
recreation and conservation plan for a working cranberry bog, 
and municipal open space plans. 

- encourages neighboring communities to work together. 
Projects range from planning a regional bikeway to protecting 
shared water resources. 



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The Department of Environmental Management, the state's 
primary land preservation agency and steward of the 
Commonwealth's forests and parks, is responsible for directing 
the Bay Circuit Program and for working with the fifty cities 
and towns designated as part of the Bay Circuit. 

For more information contact: 

The Bay Circuit Program 

Division of Planning and Development 

Department of Environmental Management 

225 Friend Street 

Boston, MA. 02114 

(617) 727-3160 



The ^ /1|, ^' B3 "' 
Bay Circuit 
Program 




for Rural V 

r Watersh 
Kem ■ ! : Bassett, Sasaki Associates, 
Davj pp. Massachusetts Audubon So 
Chari ,■". Eliot, I!, Original prop. 
Dane Lee. S'ull and Lee, Archiieci 
Hob' t Lemi'e, Land Use Consults 
Lawrence Morse, Ipswich R 
Renee Robin, Harvard Program on 

■ Pi; 

sskind, Southborouj 

. (as: hu p$ Centers 
onaj I iann 

■ ■ al Massa 
ikis, Gov 
, Secretai 
■■ Office of Environ n, 

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The Department of Environmental Management, the state's 
primary land preservation agency and steward of the 
Commonwealth's forests and parks, is responsible for directing 
the Bay Circuit Program and for working with the fifty cities 
and towns designated as part of the Bay Circuit. 

For more information contact: 

The Bay Circuit Program 

Division of Planning and Development 

Department of Environmental Management 

225 Friend Street 

Boston, MA. 02114 

(617) 727-3160 




Goven *''■" Ac vise y Committee 

Gord|f$Abl4Bli& er for Rural Massachusetts 

Abig^ ra Club 

Rita Barron, Charles River Watershed Association 

Kenneth Bassett, Sasaki Associates, Landscape Architects 

David Clapp, Massachusetts Audubon Society 

Charles W. Eliot, II, Original proponent of Bay Circuit 

David Lee, Stull and Lee, Architects 

Robert Xemire, Land Use Consultant 

Lawrence Mors%Ipswich RiVer Watershed Association 

Renee Robin, Harvard Program on Public Space Partnerships 

Reed Stewart, Plymouth County Wildlands Trust 

Larry Susskind, Southborough Open Land Foundation 

Greg Watson, Massachusetts Centers of Excellence Corp. 

Robert Yaro, Dir. of Regional Planning, University of Mass. 

C&qjjfiioriwealth of Massac} 

el S. Dukakis, Governor 
s S. Hoyte, Secretary, 
xecutive Office of Environmental Affairs 
James Gutensohn, Commissioner, 
Department of Environmental Management 



Photos 

1. Framingham; photo courtesy Christina Dierker 

2. Essex; photo courtesy Mark S. Finnen 

3. Jffamilfon; photo courtesy Mark S. Firfken 

W ' • i at 

4. 1 opsfield; phom courtesy Christina Dierker 

5. Cover photo: Rowley; Christina Dierker